Flour additives can pose health risk: FDA

Source: Taipei Times  ( http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/07/25/2003651758 )

CHEWY TEXTURE:One of the chemicals used can also be found in yoga mats and shoe soles, and the additive is banned in Europe and Australia, a nephrologist said

By Lee I-chia  /  Staff reporter

5347071363_80212f9463_b

Many flour products contain azodicarbonamide (ADA) and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) — which are legal additives in Taiwan — and the chemicals can have adverse effects in some people, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said, adding that it will evaluate whether regulations should be amended.

A report by the Chinese-language Apple Daily newspaper yesterday said that the color and texture of chewy white bread and white noodles can be induced by flour containing BPO and ADA, which were approved in food production more than 20 years ago.

Commenting on the report, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital nephrologist Yen Tzung-hai (顏宗海) said that “BPO is a flour bleaching agent and ADA is a quality improvement agent that is used as a foaming agent to make dough rise faster.”

ADA is also used in yoga mats and shoe soles to increase elasticity, and the chemical is banned as a food additive in Europe and Australia, Yen said, adding that the use of BPO as a food additive is banned in Europe and China.

BPO breaks down to benzoic acid and oxygen, Yen said, adding that people with weak liver function might have difficulty metabolizing benzoic acid, children who are exposed to benzoic acid might have higher risks of developing attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and BPO can trigger allergic reactions or asthma in some people.

Taiwan allows the use of ADA in food products at levels below 45 parts per million (ppm) and BPO at levels below 60ppm, but the chemicals must be listed on product labels.

“Food companies that do not reveal [the use of BPO or ADA] on their labels may face a fine between NT$40,000 and NT$4 million [US$1,247 and US$124,727],” FDA Division of Food Safety official Hsu Chao-kai (許朝凱) said.

“To decide whether the chemicals should be removed from the list of food additives or whether regulations need to be amended to tighten standards, [the agency] will need to conduct more evaluations,” Hsu said.

This story has been viewed 1555 times.

Egg products found to contain nicarbazin: FDA

Source: Taipei Time (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/07/19/2003651351)

By Lee I-chia  /  Staff reporter

egg-spring-fruhlingsanfang-spring-awakening-easter

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspection of meat and poultry products found residues of the chemical nicarbazin in two types of chicken egg products and one type of duck egg product.

The agency conducted the random inspection of 118 meat or poultry products at wholesale markets, egg farms, hyperrmarkets and supermarkets between March and May, testing for 126 types of drugs used on animals.

The products tested included 15 pork products, 20 meatball products, 42 chicken egg products, 16 duck egg products, 20 cow milk products and five goat milk products.

FDA Central Center for Regional Administration official Chen Tzu-ling (陳姿伶) said the affected chicken egg products were from Yu Chuan Farm (宇泉牧場) and Chang Hsiung Farm (章雄畜牧場), both in Pingtung County; and the duck eggs were from Hsing Lung Farm (興隆畜牧場) in Taichung.

Nicarbazin is a legal feed additive that contains a veterinary drug of a low toxicity, but it can cause harm to the kidneys if the concentration is high, the FDA said.

Council of Agriculture regulations stipulate that nicarbazin with a concentration between 100 parts per million (ppm) and 200ppm can be added to chicken feed, but chickens cannot be fed with nicarbazin within five days before products are brought to market and that feed containing nicarbazin cannot be given to egg-producing hens, the FDA said.

Chen said 2,732 eggs containing nicarbazin residue have been recalled and destroyed, and the farms could be fined between NT$60,000 and NT$200 million (US$1,874 and US$624,531), according to the Act Governing Food Safety and Sanitation (食品安全衛生管理法).

Food Safety for Chronic Disease Prevention Through Product Reformulation

This topic was moderated by Hui-Yu Sheu, M.S., R.D. and Angela H. Lu, Ph.D., R.D and featured three lectures.

 

Elizabeth Dunford, Ph.D., Food Policy Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Australia discussed challenges and opportunities in monitoring changes in the global food supply. In 2010 The Food Monitoring Group established a global branded food composition database to track the nutritional content of foods and make comparisons between countries, food companies and over time in an effort to observe whether companies were adhering to their reformulation commitments. Dr. Dunford shared lessons learned from establishing this database and discussed challenges and opportunities arising from ongoing change in the global food supply. Dr. Dunford noted that data from Australia and the United Kingdom were used to define baseline levels of sodium in major food categories to enable monitoring of changes over time. Comparisons of sodium levels between years exposed the limited progress with sodium reduction in Australia and New Zealand, with data presented at the individual company level.

 

Wen-Han Pan, Ph.D., Researcher, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan gave a lecture entitled, “Product Reformulation Embracing Whole Foods and Cultural Needs for Better Health.” Dr. Pan discussed the prevalence of processed foods in the modern diet, and the health-related reasons why processed food products may be reformulated to include higher amounts of whole foods. Dr. Pan shared options for enriching ingredient lists further with the benefits of increased amounts of whole foods, including nuts, seeds, whole grain products, low-fat dairy products, and dairy products supplemented with calcium, fiber, vitamin D, and probiotics.

 

Rutger Schilpzand, Executive Secretary, Choices International Foundation, Belgium discussed product reformulation driven by front-of-pack logo systems. Mr. Schilpzand shared experiences from the implementation of a front-of-pack logo used in several European countries. The implementation of this logo led to product reformulation in some sectors, and as such has had a positive impact on consumer health and consumer knowledge. Due to its positive effect, this front-of-pack logo has been implemented in several countries and is also being used as a model for the development of national logo systems in others. Mr. Schilpzand cited a study done at VU University of Amsterdam Kroonenburg that found the logo system to have been a strong driver for product reformulation.

 

 

NCFSER NEWS »

Flour additives can pose health risk: FDA

Flour additives can pose health risk: FDA

Source: Taipei Times  ( http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/07/25/2003651758 ) CHEWY TEXTURE:One of the chemicals used can also be found in yoga...

 
Egg products found to contain nicarbazin: FDA

Egg products found to contain nicarbazin: FDA

Source: Taipei Time (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/07/19/2003651351) By Lee I-chia  /  Staff reporter A Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

 

Food Safety for Chronic Disease Prevention Through Product Reformulation

This topic was moderated by Hui-Yu Sheu, M.S., R.D. and Angela H. Lu, Ph.D., R.D and featured three lectures.   Elizabeth Dunford, Ph.D., Food Policy Division,...

 
4th Asia-Pacific International Food Safety Conference (2016/10/11)

4th Asia-Pacific International Food Safety Conference (2016/10/11)

4th Asia Pacific International Food Safety Conference & 7th Asian Conference on Food and Nutrition Safety, which will be held on October 11-13, 2016 at the St....